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Case Studies

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Computer Forensics Case Study

Issue:

 

A female attorney suspected her ex-husband of accessing her computer systems, including sensitive case files and possibly wire-tapping her home. The husband was a highly skilled forensic computer specialist capable of spying on her professional and personal activities.

 

Solution:

 

Infortal conducted a forensic evaluation of both office and home computer systems, including countermeasures sweeps of her business and home, in addition to cellular forensic evaluation of home telephones and cellular phones.

 

Benefit:

 

The results showed that the husband had installed tracking spyware on her home systems which provided him with unauthorized access to her confidential information.

 
Money-laundering & Corruption

Issue:

 

A Fortune 500 company was acquiring a start-up company based in the USA, and wanted to know more about the key management team as they would be integrated into the parent company post-acquisition. The acquisition deal was worth around $50 million.

 

Solution:

 

Infortal conducted a due diligence investigation on the business and C-level team. Our investigation revealed that the start-up’s business activity was legitimate in the USA; however, some of the managers had red flag issues in the USA that lead to further investigation in their country of origin.

 

Extending the investigation overseas revealed a complex web of murder, corruption; racketeering, money laundering in the amount of $20 million, and bribery of local officials prior to their arrival in the USA.

 

Benefit:

 

This information saved the parent company from a variety of serious issues and liability exposures during and following the acquisition process. Additionally there could have been serious public relations problems for the parent company had this information been revealed to the public after an important acquisition.

   
Anti-competitive behavior

Issue:

 

The General Manager of a technology company’s international division was regularly not showing up for work 2 to 3 days a week for two years. Our client’s executive team became more and more alarmed about the GM’s unusual behaviour and asked Infortal to investigate the situation.

 

Solution:

 

Infortal recommended surveillance of the executive’s actions on a daily basis for one week to determine he went each day. During surveillance, we determined that the GM was working at another company. In fact he turned out to be the President of the second company, which was our client’s largest rival competitor in that region. He managed a $30 million subsidiary company for our client but owned the competing company with revenues of over $40 million.

 

Benefit:

 

Infortal’s investigation detected a major case of anti-competitive behavior, fraud, stealing client information, stelaing confidential customer lists and anti-comepetitive market positioning. All of these actions by a single executive created an act of sabotage against the client company’s business, damaging their customer-base and diminishing their business revenue for that region for many years.

   
Romantic infatuation or suicidal threat

Issue:

 

A client asked Infortal to conduct a threat risk assessment on a male employee who appeared to have a romantic infatuation with his manager. The employee was leaving his manager love notes and sending her flowers daily for several weeks. He claimed that if the manger would not return his love he would commit suicide. His e-mails and wording were escalating in frequency and intensity over time.

 

Solution:

 

Infortal conducted a threat risk assessment. We determined that although the employee did not make specific threats, his psychological situation was degenerating and his language and intensity were escalating. We assessed the situation as a moderate risk and took appropriate protection measures while the employee was under review.

 

Benefit:

 

Infortal’s intervention diffused this workplace situation and prevented things from escalating further. The client was able to retain the manager safely, and provide an option for the employee to relocate to another office and to undergo counseling with a successful outcome in both cases.

   
Fraud and abuse against a minor child

Issue:

 

A major nationwide retail employer was concerned about escalating problems among its employee workforce: performance issues, drug-trafficking at work, and other serious issues indicating co-worker hostility and potential workplace violence. The management of the company asked Infortal to re-check the existing employee backgrounds.

 

The Solution



Infortal’s checks revealed that 10% of the existing employees had criminal convictions, including felony and misdemeanor convictions that had not been correctly identified by the other agency.

In one case a job applicant indicated that she had no prior criminal convictions on her job application form. The other agency reported that she had no criminal convictions.

Infortal physically conducted a court search finding that the applicant had used the personal identification details of her disabled son and took out multiple bank loans in her child’s name to purchase several vehicles. After serving several months in jail for grand theft, the subject was arrested for battery against the same disabled child.

Further court document examination revealed that the subject refused to attend court-ordered parenting classes; violating her probation and she had been returned to jail.

 

The Benefits

 

The client was able to terminate the employee for presenting incorrect information on their application forms. This was one of many cases where the criminal history was serious and warranted termination of employment to prevent potential acts of misconduct or harm against the company and to protect the company’s other employees.

   
Felony Accessory to Murder (Criminal records accuracy)

Issue:

 

A nationwide company with a large call center wanted to check an employee’s concerns that another employee had been convicted of a serious felony for being an accessory to murder. The company had previously conducted a background check with a different agency, but the agency had reported “no criminal records found”. Infortal was hired to re-check the criminal history.

 

Solution:

 

Infortal’s investigators found a criminal conviction for Accessory to Murder in one county and a misdemeanor conviction in the second county for Drag-Racing. The candidate had driven the getaway car for a murder-robbery and spent his weekends drag-racing.

 

Infortal’s investigator checked the same court records in two counties and found both felony and misdemeanor convictions for the job candidate. How did that happen?

 

The first Consumer Reporting Agency (CRA) had only checked so-called “Statewide databases” which did not reveal the recent convictions and they did not have the candidate’s date of birth to double-check the information at the courthouse. Infortal had the key personal identifiers for the candidate before going to the court house to review criminal records.

 

In this case, the person was a violent felon; he was involved in a crime of armed robbery and murder, yet a different company had reported his criminal records completely clear. Imagine being the employer in this case.

 

Benefit:

 

The company was able to make a decision on whether to retain an employee that had been convicted of being an accessory to murder.

   
Same name, different spelling results in finding criminal conviction

Issue:

 

A client contacted Infortal with a request to conduct a thorough background investigation on a new hire who would be a key employee reporting directly to a CEO of a company. A regular background check of a candidate run by a Consumer Reporting Agency didn’t show any red flags.

 

Solution:

 

The subject had no criminal records under his given and legal name “McGraw” (name changed for confidentiality reasons). However, after deeper search Infortal found a criminal conviction under the name “MacGraw”.

 

Infortal’s research showed the court recorder had incorrectly spelled the defendant’s last name. Although the name was corrected later by the court, the original case header was never changed. The other Consumer Reporting Agency’s data was not correct. They did not verify all AKA’s (Also Known As names) and obviously did not have the applicant’s date of birth before checking court records so they missed both the AKA and the “hidden” criminal conviction.

 

Benefit:

 

The job candidate under review had a criminal conviction that was not found by another company using only the name provided on the employment application. Infortal’s investigators reviewed the entire court file to correctly identify the person, we found both the AKA name and the criminal conviction under the second name.

 

   
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